The long game refers to your drives (shots off the tee) and fairway shots; everything short of the shots you make to get onto the green.

Each hole has a different difficulty level, different par and distinctive hazards, so instructing you to use your Driver on every tee would be blatantly wrong. This is something you will learn over time as you learn the various shots you make according to the club, the placement of the ball and your personal swing.

Generally speaking, the lower the club number, the longer and lower your ball will go. A 4-iron shot will travel long and low and will most likely roll, whereas a 9-iron shot will have much more loft and go less distance both in the air and on the ground.

The professionals on television make it look so easy; they consistently hit the ball long and straight and never miss-hit the ball making it dribble ten feet, or completely miss the ball.

Driving is very important to the game, and many hours spent at the driving range will help improve your distance. Experiment with the same club to see what works for you if you move the ball forward or backward in your stance. Take a lesson, if possible, and learn the proper swing from the beginning.

Mastering the long game helps you get to the green in fewer strokes, keeping your score and frustration level down. Remember that it takes a long time to learn consistency and remember to have fun!

It’s never easy asking for help, but in golf, it is almost a necessity.  Unfortunately,  we often ask our buddies and partners, when in reality we should take a lesson or two.

We think that a Pro would critique harshly, but they are honest, positive and very helpful.  Lessons at the local course aren’t as expensive as you might think and they are worth it because your game will improve rapidly and cause you less frustration,  making the game much more enjoyable for you.

Of utmost importance, is being honest about your game.  The Pro will ask you what you want to start with; driving, chipping, putting or whatever you feel you need help with.  Listen carefully and follow the instructions. You may have doubts if the Pro changes your stance, your grip or your swing;  the Pro knows best.

Don’t hesitate to ask questions. Don’t worry about if the question or concern in stupid-they’ve heard it all before and will not make you feel like an idiot for asking.  If you don’t “get it”, tell him/her that you’re not getting it. You should never walk away from a lesson with unanswered questions.

You can concentrate on one thing during a lesson, or several. You might start with a lesson in driving;  get the right grip, the right stance, the right swing, the right follow-through in one lesson, and then practice it.  Next time, you might work on your short game, or putting.

You’ve invested in the equipment, doesn’t it make sense to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your abilities?

Before you start a round of golf, it is important thatyou  remember to warm up for the match. People warm up for their chosen sports all the time, as it reduces the  risk of injury; golf is no different. By the time professionals step up to the first tee, they are fully  prepared to give their best from the first swing onward.

To get a good exercise round in, you will need to warm up; that will mean getting to the course early. You may need to take care of things in the golf shop or anything else  that you have planned, but you must not feel rushed to get all these things done just so you can get a good warm up  in. Get there early and get everything done so that you can get a nice exercise session done in time.

Putting is a big part of golf and as such, you will need to do some warming up before you start putting. It is the  slowest and smoothest of all strokes in golf, which means you will need a different warm up. So set some golf balls down, starting  putting; and you should be ready to tackle  any greens that come your way when golfing.

Stretching can improve your game radically, especially if  you stretch properly. It will also help you avoid injuries, which are often the result of tense muscles. 

Time your warm up so that you will make it to the first tee in time with everyone else. You do not want to stand there for a few minutes after you just finished warming up. If you do have a delay, stand by the side of the tee, make slow swings, and stretch so that you can stay loose.

If you choose not to warm up before a game, then you are  starting the game with a severe handicap.